We’ve adopted a charity

 

Our fundraising barometer for Birmingham Children's hospital

Part of getting the Investors in Excellence standard involved identifying areas that the Observatory could improve in.  One of these improvement areas was our engagement with society.  We decided that one way to engage better with society would be to adopt a local charity.  This in turn will help our local community as we raise money through fundraising activities.

We held an internal vote last year to decide which charity to adopt and Birmingham Children’s Hospital won.  Birmingham Children’s Hospital provides health services to children, young people and families.  It is a leading paediatric teaching centre in the country, with international research and development in a range of areas.  The hospital has over: 200 departments; 20 wards; 285 in-patient beds; and treats 225,000 sick children from all over the UK.  More information is available from Birmingham Children’s Hospital fundraising webpage.

To help organise fundraising activities, we’ve set up a fundraising committee at the Observatory.  We aim to raise at least £1,000 by the end of 2010.  So far, Andrina Dhillon has undertaken a sponsored silence which raised an amazing £224, and we held a dress down day before Easter which raised £36.  We’re planning a number of other activities over the year to raise more money.  If you’d like to take part or have any fundraising ideas, please contact Raj Kaur, Clare Rapkins, Naomi Winchurch or Evette Jayatilake.

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Latest health survey for England published

The latest findings and trends identified from the Health Survey for England has been released by National Health Service Information Centre.

The Survey is a series of annual surveys designed to measure health and health-related behaviours in adults and children living in private households in England.

health-survey-for-england-07-trends The latest trends report shows that obesity has increased among adults over the period from 13 per cent for men and 16 per cent for women in 1993 to 24 per cent for both men and women in 2007.

Similarly, the proportion of children who were obese increased from 11 per cent in 1995 to 17 per cent in 2007 among boys, and from 12 per cent in 1995 to 16 per cent in 2007 among girls.

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