Roundup of Census 2011 outputs event in Leicester

Office for National Statistics logoLast Thursday, I attended a Census 2011 outputs event.  It was hosted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in Leicester, and covered a range of Census-related topics.

I’ve highlighted key points from the event in this post.

The biggest proposed change to the Census in 2011, compared to 2001, is to open up access to the data. ONS want to move away from static tables towards dynamic tables, such as data cubes, that allow researchers to interrogate data more.

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Invitation to ONS 2011 Census outputs consultation event in Leicester

Office for National Statistics logoThe next full census of England and Wales will take place in 2011. It includes a number of new approaches which will be evaluated during a rehearsal on 11th October 2009 with around 135,000 selected households in three local authority areas.

The Census Rehearsal will test, among other things, the questions being asked, the accuracy of the address list for posting out questionnaires and the new internet services for getting help and completing questionnaires online.

Planning and preparation for the outputs from the 2011 Census is continuing with a series of roadshows in October 2009 to formally start the consultation on outputs.

Along with the original event locations across England, an additional event will now be held at the Marriott Hotel in Leicester on Monday 12th October Thursday 22nd October.

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Census white paper sets out plans for 2011

Helping-shape-tomorrowThe government has published a White Paper, Helping to shape tomorrow, setting out plans for the 2011 Census. The Census will take place on Sunday 27 March 2011 and will be the first undertaken by the new UK Statistics Authority.

Unlike previous Censuses, most of the forms will be posted out this time, with only around 5% being hand delivered. There will also be an opportunity to complete the forms on-line for the first time. Despite these changes, the estimated cost will still be nearly £500 million.

The questionnaire for 2011 will be slightly longer than in 2001.

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